Oakridge Supplying Batteries for 400-Mile Electric Semi-Truck System

Posted by Lauren Tyler on March 02, 2016 2 Comments
Categories : Up Front

Oakridge Global Energy Solutions has announced that it will be supplying batteries for a 400-mile interstate truck system built by Freedom Trucking in Minnesota.

According to Oakridge, Freedom Trucking has developed a fully electric interstate truck propulsion system that will enable interstate trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating of 80,000 pounds to travel more than 400 miles per charge. By utilizing a proprietary logistical system, powered by specially designed Oakridge battery systems, Freedom Trucking says it can now begin to utilize its electric interstate trucks in the interstate logistics industry to move products from Chicago to Minneapolis on a daily basis beginning later this year.

Using fully electric trucks to move this cargo will save each truck in excess of $0.60 per mile over traditional diesel fuel, according to initial analysis for Freedom Trucking by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

“The custom battery design for Freedom Trucking is an absolute game-changer. We are excited to be working with Freedom Trucking and their team on such a revolutionary product,” says Oakridge CEO Steve Barber. “We at Oakridge are continuing our mission to onshore manufacturing back to the U.S., and this is a really big win for all of us.”

Freedom Trucking has been working on the design of the propulsion system with Ohio State University scientists and others for the past five years. This product is now ready for full-scale production this year with high-quality, “Made in USA” Oakridge battery systems.

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Comments

  1. Cost per mile is fine for cars, but freight moves at cost per ton-mile. That information needs to be included to truly report the significance of this technology. The charging infrastructure and electricity cost also needs to be factored in based on the charging level (Level 1, 2 or DC fast-charging) and the electricity rate (often charging a larger battery pack like this truck would have the rates go up because of demand charges)..

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